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      Company Overview

      Graybar, a Fortune 500 company, specializes in supply chain management services, and is a leading North American distributor of high quality components, equipment, and materials. We serve the construction market, the commercial, institutional, and government (CIG) market, and the industrial and utility markets. Graybar products and services support new construction, infrastructure updates, building renovation, facility maintenance, repair and operations, and original equipment manufacturing.

      Company Culture and Locations

      Powering the New Era

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      For more than 150 years, Graybar has been working to the advantage of its customers and the communities where we do business. Click the link below to learn more about our rich history, bright future and community involvement.

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      Through a network of 289 locations across the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico, our 8,700 employees serve approximately 145,000 customers. Our corporate headquarters are located in St. Louis, Missouri.

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      Graybar Empowers Communities Nationwide

      Employees give more than 100,000 hours of service, Donate $1.6 million to charity in 2019

      Graybar, a leading distributor of electrical, communications and data networking products and provider of related supply chain management and logistics services, today announced the results from its Empowering Our Communities program, which was introduced last year in celebration of the company’s 150th anniversary and 90 years of employee ownership.?

      In 2019, Graybar employees gave 100,665 hours of volunteer service to their local communities nationwide, surpassing the company’s goal of 90,000 hours. In addition, Graybar and its employees donated more than $1.64 million to worthy causes, exceeding the original goal of $1.5 million.?

      As part of the Empowering Our Communities program, Graybar introduced a matching gifts program for employee charitable donations, and employees received a paid day to volunteer in the community. Both of these will continue in 2020.

      “Graybar has a long history of generously giving back to the communities where we live and work,” said Chairman, President and CEO Kathy Mazzarella. “Strengthening our communities was at the heart of our anniversary celebration. I thank our employees, retirees, suppliers, customers, family members and friends for joining together to make a difference. We look forward to powering a new era for our communities in 2020 and beyond.”

      To learn more about how Graybar is empowering communities, please visit www.graybar150.com.

      Graybar, a Fortune 500 corporation and one of the largest employee-owned companies in North America, is a leader in the distribution of high quality electrical, communications and data networking products, and specializes in related supply chain management and logistics services. Through its network of nearly 290 North American distribution facilities, it stocks and sells products from thousands of manufacturers, helping its customers power, network and secure their facilities with speed, intelligence and efficiency. For more information, visit www.jiaozi13.icu or call 1-800-GRAYBAR.

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      Graybar Recognized as Atlanta Top Workplace Seven Years in a Row

      ST. LOUIS, Mar. 3, 2020 – Graybar, a leading distributor of electrical, communications and data networking products and provider of related supply chain management and logistics services, was named a Top Workplace by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution for the seventh consecutive year.

      “Being recognized as a top workplace in Atlanta for seven years in a row is a tremendous honor,” said Atlanta District Vice President David Bender. “This award is a testament to our employees and their passion for serving customers and powering the new era of distribution.”

      Energage LLC, a leading research and consulting firm, collects employee feedback through an anonymous survey to determine the Top Workplace list. The survey measures organizational health factors relating to workplace culture, such as employee engagement and company leadership.

      To learn more about Atlanta’s Top Workplaces, visit https://www.ajc.com/top-workplaces/. To learn more about career opportunities at Graybar, visit www.jiaozi13.icu/careers.

      Graybar, a Fortune 500 corporation and one of the largest employee-owned companies in North America, is a leader in the distribution of high quality electrical, communications and data networking products, and specializes in related supply chain management and logistics services. Through its network of nearly 290 North American distribution facilities, it stocks and sells products from thousands of manufacturers, helping its customers power, network and secure their facilities with speed, intelligence and efficiency. For more information, visit www.jiaozi13.icu or call 1-800-GRAYBAR.

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      How To Build a Motor Starter in Accordance With UL 508A

      With five different motor starter construction options to choose from, panel builders should weigh out the pros and cons of each before selecting the right one for a specific application. Scott Whitsitt, a Product Application Engineer for Schneider Electric, explains how.

      UL 508A allows control panel builders to apply a UL label to their finished assemblies without having to run those assemblies through specific UL testing. As long as they adhere to the standard’s requirements, builders can put the UL label on the finished product and save money by not having to send it to UL for testing.

      According to UL, the UL 508A standard applies to industrial control panels intended for general industrial use that operate from a voltage of 1000 volts or less. This standard also applies to industrial control panel enclosures and industrial control panels used for flame safety supervision of combustible fuel type equipment; elevator control; crane or hoist control; service equipment use and various other applications.?

      The first iteration of UL 508A stated that you must put a label and a short circuit current rating on the panel, but didn’t really explain how that rating should be applied in the field. Over time, as it went through another four or five iterations, the standard was made more rigorous. Its current iteration was published in 2018, at which point many of Schneider Electric’s customers began to ask us what they needed to do in order to adhere to it. Two years isn’t a long time in our industry, so the latest version of UL 508A is still fairly new.?

      Over the last few years, the requirements around UL-related documentation became more stringent. That means panel builders must be prepared to show the work they’ve done when building motor starters in accordance with UL 508A. Documentation is especially important during inspections, when builders are asked to verify exactly how they assembled and installed the motor starter – this is a key concern in the industry right now. ?

      The Four Functions of Combination Starters
      A motor starter is a contactor combined with a motor overload relay, while a combination starter also includes a disconnect and short-circuit protection. The most common type of packaged motor controllers, combination starters got their name due to the way they’re constructed and what combined functions they handle. National Electrical Code (NEC) Article 430 defines the required functions of combination starters, while UL specifies the tests and verifications that the components must pass before they can be listed as suitable for use for those functions.

      Required Functions in Branch Circuits for a Motor Load

      UL-defined combination starters include these four key functions, each of which can either be a separate device or incorporated into a single device:?

      • A motor disconnect
      • The motor branch circuit protection
      • A motor controller
      • The motor overload protection (built into the assembly)

      There are myriad ways to configure this combination, but in most cases the motor starters include:?

      • A disconnecting isolation device (typically a switch);?
      • some type of short-circuit protection (a fuse or circuit breaker);
      • a manual or automatic motor controller (a contactor or manual starter) and?
      • the motor overload protection.

      It’s important to note that motor overload protection is different than the overload protection that a typical circuit breaker provides. A circuit breaker is designed to protect the conductors that it feeds, but motor overload protection is designed to protect the actual motor.

      Earning the UL 508A Label
      There are numerous qualifications control panel builders must meet in order to be a UL 508A certified panel shop. One of the most talked-about yet most poorly understood of these is the requirement that panel builders specify the maximum short-circuit current that the panel can withstand on their UL 508A label. This requirement impacts the design and component selection for every panel the builder ships. Understanding this aspect of the control panel builder’s business provides Schneider an opportunity to increase our credibility and strengthen our role as a resource for our customers.

      The amount of current that flows in a short circuit can be very high, due to the fact that it is a very low-resistance path for the current to flow. For example, the short circuit current can be in the tens of thousands—if not hundreds of thousands—of amps, whereas the device experiencing that current may only be designed to operate continuously at 25 amps. Because of this, a short-circuit current can be extremely dangerous and can create numerous hazards, including physical damage, fire, injury, or death. That’s why knowing how much short-circuit current a control panel can be subjected to without extensive damage is so important. This maximum current value is specified on the control panel’s label as the “short circuit current rating”, or “SCCR”. ?

      Motor Control Lifestyle

      Once the control panel is installed, the NEC requires the end user to be able to document that the panel’s SCCR is greater than or equal to the amount of short circuit current the panel might be exposed to. From the panel builder’s standpoint, a higher SCCR on their panel gives their customers more confidence that the installation is safe and will be approved. It also means the control panel is likely to be suitable for more customers and applications. As always, there is a tradeoff: higher SCCR often means higher cost.

      To determine an industrial control panel’s overall SCCR, the panelbuilder looks at the SCCRs of the individual components inside the panel. The lowest SCCR of any of these components is the limiting factor so that becomes the SCCR of the entire panel. UL 60947-4-1, the UL standard that applies to motor control components, sets out the minimum SCCR a component may have to be UL-listed as a stand-alone device. Every UL-listed component has this stand-alone SCCR printed on the label, and most manufacturers also provide that information in other documents, as well.

      UL 60947-4-1 also recognizes that some components may be able to accommodate higher short circuit currents when they are applied in series with certain other components and allows manufacturers to test these assemblies of components and publish the results. Control panel builders may then use these “high fault” SCCRs to increase the overall SCCR of their panel. The UL-defined combination starters are one example of an assembly of components that can have a much higher SCCR as a whole than any of the individual components alone.

      For example, let’s look at the components we might use to control a motor rated for 10HP at 460Vac. From the catalog, we would choose an LC1D25 contactor (controller function) and an LRD21 overload relay (motor overload protection function). Individually, the contactor and overload relay each have a stand-alone SCCR of only 5,000 amps but, if we add a circuit breaker to build a combination starter, that combination might have a higher SCCR. ?

      To determine this, we consult Schneider Electric’s Motor Control Solutions data bulletin (8536DB0901R09/16). Table 18 of this bulletin indicates that by putting a circuit breaker rated at 60 amps or less ahead of an LC1D25 contactor, it is possible to obtain an SCCR for the assembly of as much as 85kA at 480Vac. Similarly, Table 42 tells us that an assembly of a circuit breaker and an LRD21 overload relay can have an SCCR as high as 65kA. If we select a BDL36040 circuit breaker – which has an 18kA interrupting rating – the combination starter now carries an overall SCCR of 18kA at 480Vac. Depending upon the type of combination starter and the specific components used, such SCCRs can go as high as 130,000 amps.

      Combination Starter Construction Types?
      There are currently five different combination starter types, each of which incorporates a different set of aligned components. Types A, C and D are three-component solutions that usually include a fusible switch or circuit breaker (plus the contactor and motor overload relay). The Type E starter is a self-protected combination controller where all four functions are built into a single device (i.e., a “one device” solution). The Type F starter is a two-device solution that combines these functions, but is not self-protected.?

      How to Build a Motor Starter in Accordance with UL 508A-4

      Type A through D combination starters are often considered “traditional” starters and use separate UL 60947-4-1-listed motor controllers and overload relays along with UL 98 listed disconnect switch and fuses, or a UL 489 listed circuit breaker, for the disconnect and short-circuit protection. Good examples of these are the Class 8538 & 8539 Type S combination starters, although IEC style controls may also be used and they do not need to be individually enclosed.

      Type E combination starters perform all four motor control functions in a single device. This type of starter has been recognized by UL since 1990 and may take the form of either a manual or an electromechanical (remotely operated) motor starter. UL added a separate set of short-circuit and endurance performance tests to their 60947-4-1 standard specifically for the Type E self-protected category. The TeSys GV2?and?GV3 are UL listed as Type E manual motor controllers and can be used to control motor branch circuits if manual-only switching of the motor is acceptable. TeSys U combination starters allow manual operation of the disconnect function, short circuit protection, motor overload protection and remote operation of the controller function.

      Type F starters combine the manual UL 508A Type E manual starter with a UL 508A contactor but are not considered self-protected. This combination starter typically consists of a GV2 or GV3 manual starter and a TeSys D contactor. A separate overload relay is not required because the Type E starter has this function built in. Type F starters are evaluated under the same short-circuit tests as Types A through D.

      Any Advantages or Disadvantages?
      When selecting the best starter construction type for a particular application, there are always going to be tradeoffs across the A, C, D, E and F categories. There are advantages and disadvantages to each, and picking the right one will depend on the specific application and how the panel will be used. In most cases, the choice will come down to a trade-off between price and function. Here are some of the basic pros and cons of each:?

      • Types A and C are basic combination starters that have either a fused switch (A) or a thermal magnetic circuit breaker (C). Those are very common components that are easy to find and assemble. Type A combination starters rely on fuses, which many builders prefer when it comes to very high short-circuit protection. They also have manual switches and incorporate short-circuit protection that differs from what you’d see used in a circuit breaker. Circuit breakers also are resettable after an overcurrent event, minimizing downtime and replacement costs.?
      • Type D starters use instantaneous trip circuit breakers, also known as motor circuit protectors, instead of thermal magnetic, which creates some advantages in terms of how the breaker is sized and the level of protection that it provides. The biggest trade-off between Types C and D is the ability to adjust the motor inrush sensitivity using a dial, instead of having to replace the entire breaker unit.?
      • Type F motor starters also come with their own pros and cons. With Type F, you can buy the components and assemble the starter out in the field. Type F only requires two components, which means it takes up less space than a three-component solution.?
      • Finally, Type E is even more functional than its counterparts because it is typically built into a single device that incorporates all four combination starter functions. It’s compact and takes up the least amount of space of any of the solutions for a given motor size or motor horsepower. Also, Type E UL 508A testing is extremely rigorous; after a fault, it must be able to be operated again with just a reset. For critical loads, and in settings where you can’t afford the downtime to be able to make repairs, the Type E starter is the better choice. The trade-off is that Type E solutions may be more expensive than the Type F options.?

      By selecting the right motor starter for the application, following the guidelines outlined in this article and carefully documenting all steps through the process, panel builders can use an approach that not only aligns with UL 508A standards, but that also keeps building occupants, visitors and property safe.

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      How to Modernize Your Datacom Infrastructure

      Data communications infrastructure is the heart of digital business transformation. Speedier connections, mesh computing and other advancements are critical for businesses to leverage cutting-edge technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, the Internet of Things (IoT), next-generation data analytics and more. ?

      The frontier of connected and autonomous vehicles is illustrative of near-future transformations. It’s predicted that in just five years there will be 100 million connected vehicles across the globe, transmitting over 100 petabytes of data per month. In comparison, Facebook currently generates 4PB of data on an average day. By 2021 global IP traffic is expected to reach an annual run rate of 3.3 zettabytes, up from 1.2 zettabytes five years ago, according to Cisco’s forecast.?

      Of course, there are less dramatic but no less important scenarios that lead companies to upgrade datacom infrastructures, such as running a more efficient wireless network.?

      To adopt this new wave of technologies, businesses will require higher-bandwidth connectivity, driving significant changes to datacom infrastructure. Data centers will see a more condensed footprint and more high-power density equipment, such as multi-core high-end servers, demanding better cooling options.?

      The bottom line: No business can risk that its own datacom infrastructure – on-premise at headquarters and spread across edge sites – will be unprepared for the big changes coming its way.

      Trade Coax for Fiber and Category Cables to Enable 5G in Buildings

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      Wireless carriers and device manufacturers are setting the pace for 5G cellular capabilities, which promise to offer rapid download speeds (50 Mbps to 2 Gbps) and lower latency (1 to 30 ms) as their networks are upgraded over time. Carriers are rolling out these networks to more and more cities: Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Los Angeles, New York and Washington are just some of the early locations. Mobile phones with 5G connections, including those from LG and Motorola, are hitting the market, too.?

      Still, 5G is in an early phase, so expectations are tempered for enterprise adoption of fixed wireless for in-building coverage. But the future holds great possibilities for 5G and mobile wireless. Applications may run the gamut from enhanced enterprise collaboration capabilities, to virtual reality training apps, to innovative advancements in sectors like healthcare – such as streaming patient vital signs from an ambulance to a hospital ahead of arrival.?

      It's never too early to get ready, though. Behind-the-scenes connection updates are required for 5G wireless mobile communication technology. Coaxial cables will give way to fiber optic connections and Cat6 and Cat6a cabling. Distributed antenna systems (DAS), which typically are installed by building owners – the business itself or the landlord from whom it rents space – bring 5G carrier signals into the building. A DAS can support multiple carriers over one antenna network distributed throughout the building.?

      Use More Robust Cables for Faster Wi-Fi

      A main issue that datacom professionals need to address is the evolution of Wi-Fi. Wi-Fi 5 (802.11ac) already has reached mass adoption, supporting more mobile devices per user and better download experiences for them with extended Wi-Fi networks. Companies had to change out Cat6 cables to more robust Cat6a cables to handle increased bandwidth across Power over Ethernet (PoE) wireless access points. ?

      They should be pleased to hear that, as they begin the migration to Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax) for purposes such as IoT deployments, they’ll be able to count on their Cat6a cables to support the standard’s theoretical 9.6 Gbps speed (up from 3.5 Gbps on Wi-Fi 5). To take full advantage of Wi-Fi 6 technology as it evolves, they will need two Cat6a connections. ?

      “It takes a lot of cable to support a wireless system,” says Jim Tatum, a Senior Outside Sales Representative for Graybar. “The pathways out to workstations do have to consider the load, the outside diameter of the cable and the overall design of the data centers. You have to size the pathway appropriately based on the size and number of cables required.” ?

      Prepare for IoT

      As companies begin to use more interconnected, intelligent devices, such as security cameras or climate control systems, they’ll need to consider how they will best support these IoT connections. One answer is to use PoE cabling as a means of not only carrying power and data to a device, but also controlling the slew of intelligent devices connected to a business’ networks.?

      To enable high-bandwidth applications, datacom pros can use twisted-pair copper cabling, such as a Cat6 or Cat6a cable, and run it from a device to a mid-span or endpoint, where the cable can be connectorized using standard RJ-45 or similar modular connectors.?

      PoE’s ability to support both power and data transmission can optimize interoperability between intelligent devices. By enabling IoT systems to connect to a single IP network, PoE offers a more cost-efficient cabling solution – it reduces the amount of cable necessary to power and control networked IoT devices. Installation is improved, too, because there will be no need for multiple cable runs – one for power and another for communications.

      Plan for Parallel Transmission Speed for Ethernet Advancements?

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      Meanwhile in the data center, in the last year or so the move away from 10 GbE and 40 GbE Ethernet switching accelerated to 100 GbE as equipment costs fell and the technology matured. But 100 GbE is not the capper by any means.?

      Now 200 GbE and 400 GbE are gaining traction in large data centers, helping organizations that are dependent on high-bandwidth applications keep pace with accelerating networked hardware storage speeds at scale. A good option to actually achieve all the potential of 200 or 400 GbE is to choose a multi-fiber optic cable plug-and-play solution that provides a flexible migration path based on your shifting compute and storage needs while managing the complexity of large patching fields. “These are factory pre-determined, pre-polished systems that are factory tested for absolute minimal loss,” says Russ Tomlin, Business Development Manager at Graybar Atlanta. Everything is hot-swappable, so customers can add Ethernet ports as they need them, he notes.?

      Cool Down the Data Center for Edge Computing ?

      In the near future, computing, storage power and data will be pushed out to the edge of the network, so that bandwidth-intensive and latency-sensitive apps and data don’t have to travel to the cloud or to a centralized data center for processing. Avoiding the extra stop overcomes the last hurdle to near-realtime processing. “Going back to the data center could introduce delays or downtime,” Tomlin says. “The theory is that the more you move the datacom infrastructure closer to the end user, the better bandwidth you’ll experience and the less risk of losing data in transmission.” In exchange for lower latency and network bandwidth conservation, companies have to address power, cooling and cable concerns, both in the main data center and at the edge. Of course, cooling is always an issue in a data center, but that looms larger as processing moves further out.?

      In the main data center, server virtualization and server consolidation are increasing – which leads to increased data center equipment density from a square footage perspective. Fewer servers occupy fewer cabinets in a smaller space. With more power in a concentrated area, heat becomes a bigger issue. “The physical size of the data center hasn’t changed, but it is producing more heat in a small space so better cooling becomes critical,” says Tatum.?

      Even when edge computing isn’t a factor, datacom pros have to deal with the fact that, generally speaking, older data centers aren’t designed for keeping new high-density and high-variable IT equipment at the right temperature. Their designs have to be rethought to protect against equipment damage.

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      These problems can be solved with plug-in, no-footprint power distribution systems that can centralize cable distribution, too. Hot aisle/cold aisle configurations separate cold air supply from hot return air. Configurations should be decided and deployed based on parameters such as data center size and dimensions, raised floor versus overhead cabling, ceiling clearances and cooling objectives, Tatum says. Cable management systems can help by reducing cable congestion and ensuring cables are not obstructing cool or hot airflow in floors, ceilings or cabinets. ? ?

      In an edge data center, which may be just a small room or even a closet, companies need scalable technologies to avoid having to constantly make unit switch-outs across edge sites over the course of a couple of years as workload and backup demands change. A three-phase UPS power system, for instance, can be an efficient choice for reliable and redundant backup power in the mini data center. With it, businesses can ramp up from what they need to support their current load – say, 20kVa – to a future load – maybe 100 kVa.?

      Clearly, there’s no such thing as a steady-state datacom infrastructure, and that’s a good thing.?
      Without pushing the envelope on cellular, networking and computing infrastructures, businesses would stall when it comes to leveraging ever-increasing volumes of data and taking advantage of rich but bandwidth-sapping applications that will underpin the next wave of innovations. Planning today’s infrastructure builds with tomorrow’s technologies in mind will help retain the flexibility needed to adopt new solutions as they make sense.

      A new report from Accenture makes the case that there’s work to be done: It notes that enterprises have embraced advanced digital technologies, such as IoT/edge computing (77 percent), big data/analytics (83 percent) and digital customer experience (78 percent), but only 36 percent are “very satisfied” that their network currently has the capabilities required to support their business needs.

      The sooner businesses upgrade their datacom infrastructure for a rapidly changing world, the better.

      ? 2020 Graybar Services, Inc. ?All rights reserved.

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      Graybar Introduces New Scholarship for Construction Trades

      ST. LOUIS, Jan. 6, 2020?-- Graybar, a leading distributor of electrical, communications and data networking products and provider of related supply chain management and logistics services, today announced the launch of the Graybar Construction Trades Scholarship.

      "Skilled workers are vital to the long-term success of the construction industry," said Graybar Chairman, President and CEO Kathy Mazzarella. "Because of labor shortages, many of our customers are struggling to keep up with demand, which ultimately impacts the entire supply chain."

      High school students who plan to enroll in a community college or trade school upon graduation are eligible to apply for Graybar's need-based, renewable scholarship. Students must intend to complete an associate degree, a pre-apprenticeship or an apprenticeship in the construction trades, such as electrical, HVAC, plumbing, pipefitting or welding. The scholarship is administered by the St. Louis Community Foundation and applications will be accepted through April 15, 2020.

      "Through this scholarship program, our goal is to increase awareness of careers in the construction trades," said Mazzarella. "We also want to remove barriers for young people with financial needs so they have the opportunity to pursue these careers."

      For more information about the Graybar Construction Trades Scholarship, as well as resources to share with students, visit www.poweringtrades.com.

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      Graybar, a Fortune 500 corporation and one of the largest employee-owned companies in North America, is a leader in the distribution of high quality electrical, communications and data networking products, and specializes in related supply chain management and logistics services. Through its network of nearly 290 North American distribution facilities, it stocks and sells products from thousands of manufacturers, helping its customers power, network and secure their facilities with speed, intelligence and efficiency. For more information, visit www.jiaozi13.icu or call 1-800-GRAYBAR.

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      Events

      Careers

      With 8,700 employees in 289 locations across North America including Canada and Puerto Rico, Graybar is a national company with local career opportunities, including:

      • Sales Representatives
      • Business Development Managers
      • Material Handlers
      • Delivery Drivers
      • Information Technology
      • Marketing
      • Internship Program

      Interested in pursuing a career in the construction trades? Click here to learn about Graybar’s new scholarship program.

      Read more about careers with Graybar??

      See All Open Positions ?
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      Awards & Accolades

      ??Named to FORTUNE World’s Most Admired Companies list for the 17th year (2019)
      ??No. 423 on the FORTUNE 500 ranking of America’s largest companies (2019)
      ??Named one of the Top Workplaces in Atlanta, the California Bay Area, South Carolina and Edison and Teterboro (2019)
      ??No. 11 on the National Center for Employee Ownership “Employee Ownership 100” list (2019)
      ??No. 3 on Electrical Wholesaling’s Top 200 Electrical Distributors list (2019)
      ??No. 4 on the Modern Distribution Management Market Leaders list (2019)
      ??Named one of Selling Power’s “Best Companies to Sell For” (2019)
      ??On Broadband Communities’ Fiber to the Home Top 100 list (2019)?
      ??No. 5 on the St. Louis Business Journal’s Top 150 Privately Held Companies list (2019)
      ??2019 Private Board of the Year Award by Private Company Director, Directors and Boards and Family Business magazines
      ? Awarded the BBB Torch Award for the company’s commitment to customer satisfaction and business ethics (2019)

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      Affiliations & Associations

      NECA
      Electri
      NEMA_Graybar_1x1
      NAW
      IDEA_Graybar_1x1
      It's-America
      Bicsi
      NAED_Graybar_1x1
      CCCA_Graybar_1x1
      NIGP_Graybar_1x1
      NALMCO_Graybar_1x1
      US-Green-Building-Council (1)
      IEC (1)
      Energy-Star (1)
      BBB (1)

      Leadership

      As a leading North American distributor, Graybar operates with one clear mission: to serve as the vital link in the supply chain, adding value for customers and suppliers with innovative solutions and services. Graybar’s strategy is to sustain the organization as an independent and employee-owned company, while achieving the results that position the company as an industry leader and allows Graybar to work to the advantage of those it serves.

      Board of Directors

      Mazzarella
      Kathy M. Mazzarella

      Chairman, President and CEO
      Joined Graybar in 1980

      Bender
      David A. Bender

      Atlanta District Vice President
      Joined Graybar in 1988

      Clifford
      Scott S. Clifford

      Senior Vice President
      and Chief Financial Officer
      Joined Graybar in 1994

      Geekie
      Matthew W. Geekie

      Senior Vice President, Secretary
      and General Counsel
      Joined Graybar in 2008

      Harvey,-Rick----September-2010-(3) (1)
      Richard H. Harvey

      New York District Vice President
      Joined Graybar in 1983

      Harwood
      Randall R. Harwood

      Senior Vice President and
      Chief Strategy Officer
      Joined Graybar in 1978

      Lyons
      Robert C. Lyons

      Regional Vice President
      Joined Graybar in 1979

      Mansfield
      William P. Mansfield

      Senior Vice President, Marketing
      Joined Graybar in 1987

      Maxwell
      David G. Maxwell

      Senior Vice President, Sales
      Joined Graybar in 1985

      Propst
      Beverly L. Propst

      Senior Vice President,
      Human Resources
      Joined Graybar in 2002

      Quality

      ISO 9001:2015 Quality Standard


      Graybar's registration to the ISO 9001:2015 quality standard represents a major achievement in establishing and maintaining a quality process. Our goal is to achieve excellence in customer service by monitoring and meeting?specific performance standards. Developed by the International Organization for Standardization, the name "ISO" does not stand for the initials of the organization, but is derived from the Greek word isos, which means, "equal."

      ISO-registered organizations document what they do, and do what they document. The registration process shows us where we can improve service levels, streamline the way we do our jobs, and drive costs down. All this makes for a productive organization that can stay focused on what is important - delivering superior distribution service to our customers. Graybar’s Quality Management System and all Graybar locations are registered to the quality standards established by ISO.

      Download a copy of Graybar’s latest ISO 9001 certificate??


      Graybar's registration to the ISO 9001:2015 quality standard represents a major achievement in establishing and maintaining a quality process. Our goal is to achieve excellence in customer service by monitoring and meeting?specific performance standards. Developed by the International Organization for Standardization, the name "ISO" does not stand for the initials of the organization, but is derived from the Greek word isos, which means, "equal."

      ISO-registered organizations document what they do, and do what they document. The registration process shows us where we can improve service levels, streamline the way we do our jobs, and drive costs down. All this makes for a productive organization that can stay focused on what is important - delivering superior distribution service to our customers. Graybar’s Quality Management System and all Graybar locations are registered to the quality standards established by ISO.

      Download a copy of Graybar’s latest ISO 9001 certificate??

      Governance

      Corporate Responsibility

      At Graybar, we believe being a good corporate citizen is simply the right thing to do. As employee-owners, we make decisions with a long-term view in mind. We have a unique and personal responsibility to each other and the Company, to our customers, and to our communities where we live and work. Holding ourselves accountable for delivering results in these three areas is something Graybar takes seriously.?

      Read more about Graybar's corporate policies and principles >>

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